Guest series: My positive birth story #7 – Emma (MummyEm)

Today, we have Emma’s story. She blogs over at MummyEm, and is Mum to Chloe and wife to Mr D. Thanks so much for sharing your story in my series!

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All through my pregnancy, I was adamant that I didn’t want to have an epidural, as I had heard stories of all the things that could go wrong. I had decided on having a water birth in the local hospital’s birthing suite.

As my due date came and went, and my bump got bigger and bigger, with every little twinge I was convinced it was time. Mr D works nights, and I was petrified it would all happen on one of the nights he would be at work.

Luckily this never happened, and at seven days overdue, I went for a sweep (this was quite possibly the most painful part of my pregnancy!). And was booked in for induction five days later. The following day, I started to get some tightening, and called the maternity unit who said it was slow labour. I went to bed excited that things may get moving now and I wouldn’t have to be induced, as that would mean my water birth that I had my heart set on wouldn’t be a possibility.

The next day the tightening had stopped and we got on with making sure everything was ready. On Sunday evening, I went to bed and my stomach felt tight and heavy, and I really struggled to get comfy and fall asleep.

In the morning I got up at 7am and went to the bathroom, and found a clot. I called the maternity ward and they advised it was normal to lose some blood from having a sweep, and it was nothing to worry about. As this was my first baby, I was petrified and said I wanted to come in just to be sure.

Mr D had literally just walked in the door from a  ten-hour night shift when I said ‘get changed, we are going to the hospital’. So off we went, me still in my pyjamas.

When we got to the hospital, I was checked over by the midwife, who told me I wouldn’t be going anywhere as I was in labour; my blood pressure was very high and they wanted t keep an eye on it. Throughout my pregnancy, my blood pressure had been fine, and I just assumed it was due to the stress of things now getting started.

They told Mr D to go home get some rest and come back in a few hours with my bags, as nothing would happen for a few hours yet. But, bless him, he was back at the hospital within an hour.

I was moved to a room and put on a drip to try to speed things up, and then had my waters broken. It was a strange sensation, but gas and air made it all a little better!

After eight hours, nothing was happening and my contractions that were in my back were getting worse. The midwife recommended an epidural for the pain and said that it would help lower my blood pressure. At this stage I was happy to try anything to help move it along and as I waited for the doctor to come along, I looked at Mr D and I think this bit scared him more than the labour.

Once the epidural started working, I tried to get some rest, propped up in bed. The nurses, bless them, had got Mr D a pull-out bed for him to get some rest as well. As he kept reminding everyone, he had been to work all night and it had been a long day for him!!!! I swear if I hadn’t been connected to a drip, I might have gotten out of bed and smothered him if I heard him tell me he was tired one more time.

At 10:30am the following day, the doctor came round to check on me, I was only 6cm dilated. They advised that the next option would be an emergency caesarean. I was petrified, but I knew it was the right thing to do. Within minutes of signing the consent form, I was wheeled down for surgery. The reality of what was about to happen was starting to sink in and, as much as I kept thinking I was about to see my beautiful baby girl very soon, I was also thinking about what was about to happen to my body.

With Mr D by my side, the surgery went ahead and our beautiful baby girl, Chloe Sandra, was born weighing a whopping 8lb 5oz.

I was taken to the recovery area and finally got to hold my daughter. Feeling in pain but happy, I just couldn’t wait to get home as family of three. However, this was not to be the case as I was told that my blood pressure was not going down, and I would be staying in recovery for the night. I was devastated, but knew it was best, especially after just having major surgery. Paul went home to get some much-needed sleep and said he would be back in the morning.

The first few hours on the recovery ward were surreal, I must have nodded off and remember waking up thinking it had been a dream. I kept looking at Chloe, amazed that she was here and petrified that I was now a mama and responsible for a little human.

My blood pressure didn’t go down for a further three days, and therefore I had to stay in hospital with the baby. It broke my heart every time Paul had to leave us to go home to an empty house, while leaving us in the hospital.

Eventually, my blood pressure went down enough to be allowed home, and after almost a week in hospital, we left as a family of three, ready to start our biggest adventure ever.

My best piece of advice for any expectant mama is to throw the birth plan out the window. You really can’t plan for such an event, and it will only stress you out, which is not good for you or the baby. Just let nature take its course and baby will come out when good and ready.

Mummy Em x

**Originally published on MummyEm**

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Thanks, Emma, for sharing your experience! Next week, we’ll hear from the lovely Sophie! If you have a positive birth story you’d like to share, please email minimummiblogger@outlook.com for more info.

About Emma

Essex Wife 🖤 Mama🖤 Blogger. Our journey through marriage and parenthood. The good the bad and sometimes ugly parts included.

Connect with Emma

Blog: http://mummyem.co.uk

Facebook: http://facebook.com/mummyemblog

Twitter: http://twitter.com/mummyemblog

Instagram: http://instagram.com/mummyemblog

About The Author

Mini Mummi Blogger

Mini Mummi Blogger is a first time mummy to a beautiful baby boy. Currently on maternity leave, she is looking to put her writing/publishing experience to good use through her blog, helping other mummies navigate through the wealth of often conflicting (and, sometimes, even discouraging) information out there about pregnancy and motherhood. She believes that every mummy knows what’s best for her own baby – even first time mums!

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